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PET-CT scan is used to understand if any part of your body includes cancer tissue or not, by creating pictures of organs and tissues inside your full body. A small amount of a radioactive substance is injected into a vein. This substance is absorbed mainly by organs and tissues that use the most energy. Because cancer cells tend to use more energy than healthy cells, they absorb more of the radioactive substance. Then, PET scanner detects this substance to produce images of the inside of the body.

Preparing for the test: When you schedule your integrated PET-CT scan, we will give you detailed instructions about how to prepare. For example, we will tell you to drink nothing but clear liquids beginning at midnight the night before your appointment and instructed to not eat or drink anything for at least four hours before your scan begins (this info is just for example and the actual directives should be obtained from our Nuclear Medicine representatives).

During the test: When you arrive LIV Hospital for the PET-CT scan, you will need to change your clothes into hospital gown or remove clothing or jewelry that could interfere with the scan (we will ask you to put such belongings into our personal safety locks, dedicated for your own use). Our nurse will deliver the radioactive substance (FDG material) needed for the PET scan into your vein through an intravenous (IV) injection. The IV line will feel like a pinprick when it is inserted, but the radioactive material will not cause any sensation in your body. After the injection, the radioactive substance will take 30 to 90 minutes to reach the tissues that will be scanned. During that time, you will need to lie quietly without moving or talking because too much movement can interfere with the normal distribution of the radioactive material and make interpreting the study more difficult. Depending on which part of your body is being scanned, you may also be given a contrast medium for the CT scan. It may be given orally (as a drink), through an IV line, or through an injection. The dye will then travel through your bloodstream to help create a clearer picture of specific parts of your body. The test typically lasts up to an hour, although the scan itself only takes about 30 minutes. If a larger part of your body is being scanned, the test may last longer.

After the test: You can expect to return to your normal activities immediately after your PET-CT scan, including driving. Drinking water will help flush the contrast medium and radioactive substance out of your body. We usually prepare your medical report within the next day of your scan. If you request the report in your own language, please warn us about your request at the time of appointment. Of course, we are delivering the reports in your own language, but this will take extra hours (or may be half day) depending on the availability of our translation office.

OUR ALL-INCLUSIVE PET-CT PACKAGE FOR INTERNATIONAL PATIENTS: We are aware that our patients may have many hesitations or questions in their minds, when it is about travelling to another country for healthcare. At this point, we are doing our best to make you feel at home, by giving full assistance during your stay in Turkey, starting from meeting you at the airport and finishing by dropping you back at the airport in the end. Your hotel and the transfers are all included within our ‘all-inclusive PET-CT package program’.

Our PET-CT package (for international patients) includes:

  • Free transportation from airport- hotel/ clinic re-turn
  • One night stay in 4/5 star hotels ( for two people with breakfast included)*
  • Free medical evaluation of the report by our specialists from Nuclear Medicine
  • PET/CT scan
  • Medical report translated in English (via mail)

*available for the hotels with which we have an agreement

 

IF YOU NEED A PET-CT SCAN, PLEASE FILL THE FOLLOWING FORM:
(We will contact you to set your appointment)
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